Dating a fender precision bass

05 Aug

The first version of 3/4 scale Fender guitars are characterized by the one-piece maple neck, the gold anodized metal pickguard, and the conservative beige color.

These are classic ’50s Fender appointments, applied to a design that was inspired at least in part by the timeless Stratocaster.

The Galanti, on the other hand, is quite a rare bird. I found it in a shop in San Diego but they were asking around 00 for it. Next to that are a couple of Norma’s and another attempt at copying the Burns pickguard. Next to that is a Hi-Lo (also available from Ibanez). Below: As you can see, we got our walls painted the other day, hope you like it! This baby looks, feels, plays like no other Bass from its time.

I found the one next to it on EBAY – in a severe state of dsrepair – for 0. Below: One last entry level Norma, then a totally cool EKO Florentine. It is a semi-hollow that looks like a cross between an SG and a 335. The funniest review I have ever read on Harmony central was about a Hi-Lo guitar. REALLY well made, big and heavy (the picture scale looks small but this is bigger than a Fender Precision). Eastwood has been making some excellent re-issue versions of this in fretless EUB-1 and fretted EEB-1 versions.

Even Richard Smith’s astonishing “Fender: The Sound Heard ‘round the World” spares only a few paragraphs to the student guitars.EKO was at the forefront, and within 2 years they were shipping over 10,000 electric guitars to USA per year.For most North American kids, including myself, their first guitar was an EKO or some Japanese import. these were all too expensive for our parents to buy for us.It is hard to imagine today, but in the early 1960’s having an electric guitar in your home was rare.In fact, it was likely that your parents were steering you in the direction of accordion lessons. The Beatles – and of course others – stopped all that.