Intimidating girl playbacks love songs Chat with a futanari

07 Nov

“I’m perfectly fine, I live on my own, I made up my mind I’m better off bein’ alone,” she starts off.

But it doesn’t stay that way for long; after meeting a (evidently non-American) paramour who pursues her, the story (and the song) go straight into the romance.

With 15 tracks, produced with pop hitmakers Max Martin, Shellback and Jack Antonoff, Swift’s latest addition to her catalogue appears to mine her past and her present for material, switching moods between unapologetic love letter and defiant clapback.

It’s all sung over a series of synth-heavy beats, and sprinkled with tinges of 80s pop, catchy dubstep drops and dance-ready hooks. ”: Starting things off with a thumping bass line and rallying cry, “…Ready For It? “In the middle of the night, in my dreams, you should see the things we do,” she sings sweetly before switching into her new-era rap-singing.

“There’s nothing I hate more than what I can’t have.” Despondent, she talks of heading home to hang out with her cats — and then, with a wink, invites her object of attention to join her. “Getaway Car”: Told as a dramatic story of a heist and an ill-fated love adventure over shimmering 80s-style production, “Getaway Car” is one of Swift’s most metaphor-driven tracks on the album.

In “King of My Heart” she hits her sweet spot, over a synth-heavy track and strategic auto-tune assist.Sheeran’s contribution comes in the form of another rap-sung verse in the same vein, seeming to reference his own relationship and the pitfalls that fame has placed in his path to love. “I never trust a narcissist, but they love me / So I play them like a violin, and I make it look oh so easy,” she opens this one over a sharp string pluck.“If a man talks s–t then I owe him nothing.” Here is new-era Swift: holding her head high, unapologetic and fiercely protective of her own success.“Lord save me, my drug is my baby, I be using for the rest of my life.” Swift has endured criticism for her relationships: the fact that she’s in them, the fact that she sings about them.“Don’t Blame Me” could be a clapback to that criticism, reminding listeners that the heart simply wants what it wants, as her friend Selena Gomez once said. “Delicate”: Swift is, appropriately enough, at her most fragile on “Delicate.” Refreshingly honest, it’s a melodic electro-ballad with a resonant refrain.