Dating new zealand

06 Feb

Everyone likes the outdoors, laughing, travelling, a glass of wine with their friends.

They're all looking for someone kind, down-to-earth, intelligent, with a good sense of humour.

Aitcheson recently started using the app again after a nine-month relationship – with a woman he met on Tinder – came to an end.

"I think it's a modern way to meet people," he says.

Where singles once struggled to get a date, apps such as Tinder make it possible to date a different person every night of the week. But there's another vast group of people using these apps who don't want such fleeting interactions.

THE STIGMA IS FADINGAitcheson senses that the stigma once attached to meeting people through technology is fading."I also like the fact you're not seeing everybody that's seeing you.I hate that thing about online dating – notifications that say 'these people are looking at you.' I like that you match if they think the same thing, or if they like you." TYPES TO AVOIDYou quickly learn the types to avoid, says Joanna: men whose photos feature a gun, a motorbike, or their ex-partner."Based on the people I know on Tinder, it is a little less serious, more 'lets hook up and have sex'." IN PRAISE OF TINDER Not so, says Hamish Aitcheson, a Tinder-using 57-year-old father of two.While he's encountered plenty of people looking for a one night stand or just having a laugh, there are hundreds of Kiwis over 40-50 using Tinder to find romance.